Health and science

findings_lsd_645x628_0_0_315 Your brain on LSD research
Long associated with “turning on, tuning in, and dropping out,” LSD has the potential to provide insights into the workings of the brain and the mechanisms that underlie certain mental illnesses.

   His and hers fat cells
The difference found between male and female patterns of fat cell gain may affect the ability of women to lose weight and maintain weight loss. Continuing research into obesity overall, and into the gender differences in fat cell behavior could lead to more effective interventions to help the obese.

  Bookworms live longer
The next time you talk to a clinician about how you’re taking care of your health, you might want to include a discussion of your reading habits.

 Desire for family, not career goals, drives egg freezing
She is a media trope: the hard-driving career woman who realizes that her biological clock is on the verge of winding down. Panicking, she freezes her eggs so she can postpone child-bearing a little longer as she pursues the next promotion. But, according to a recent study…the primary impetus behind the decision to freeze one’s eggs is quite different.

Screen Shot 2019-02-10 at 3.03.10 PM   When microbes go to school
Students working at the desks in their classrooms have a lot of company besides their classmates and teachers: the countless microbes on the desks’ surfaces.

  Ticks could be…life savers?
The same tick that can transmit serious infections to humans may become the source of a substance that could save lives.

Screen Shot 2019-02-10 at 2.43.23 PM    A different angle on asthma
Hospital emergency departments are a vital part of our health care systems. But they are not the best places for providing the ongoing care needed by those living with asthma.

animal warnings      When animals sound a warning
Ecologists and epidemiologists try to understand the not-always-felicitous interactions among humans, their environment and disease.

Screen Shot 2019-02-10 at 2.57.02 PM  Putting a price on carbon
Climate change resulting from the human-caused release of carbon dioxide increases the severity of a host of problems that affect humans directly — from hurricanes, floods, and wildfires to increases in insect-borne disease.

  Kids caught in the opioid crisis
“Enough opioids are prescribed every year to put a bottle of painkillers in every household,” Julie Gaither says, “and kids are getting into them.”

  Is gun violence catching?
The U.S. has the highest rates of gun violence among high-income countries — violence that appears to be both pervasive and random. But, according to a recent study…gun violence is not random. Rather, it is concentrated within relatively small social networks, and replicated through a process of social contagion.

 The lure of food ads
Although the reasons for Americans’ increased weight are complex, there is mounting evidence that advertising of unhealthy foods is a key factor.